Veteran Thoughts: “Suicide”

By Arturo Brooks |Staff Writer|

Suicide, a hot topic brought under the spotlight because of the popularity and trending of Netflix Original series,”13 Reasons Why,” is causing controversy and concern with the shows portrayal and representation of suicide in contemporary culture.

I have pondered for a while now whether if I should do this topic due to the sensitivity of the subject.
Suicide is never an easy topic, which is why we need to discuss it more often, instead of holding off on the conversation until it is already too late.

This is hard to discuss, not only for me, but for any individual personally.

Suicide is one of the leading causes of death in the United States.

According to National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), there are three categorizations of suicide. These types are: suicide, suicide attempt, and suicidal thoughts.

These types are: suicide, suicide attempt, and suicidal thoughts.
Suicide is defined as death caused by self-directed injurious behavior with intent to die as a result of the behavior.

A suicide attempt is a non-fatal, self-directed, potentially injurious behavior with intent to die as a result of the behavior.

A suicide attempt might not result in injury.Suicidal ideation refers to thinking about, considering, or planning suicide.

With men being more prone to commit suicide than women in all age groups ranging from ages 10-75.

The most common ways that males commit suicide is through the use of a firearm while women use poisoning.

According to NIMH, “In 2015, firearms were the most common method used in suicide deaths in the United States, accounting for almost half of all suicide deaths (22,118).”

“The rates of suicide were highest for males (27.4 per 100,000) and females (8.7 per 100,000) in the American Indian/Alaska Native group, followed by males (25.8 per 100,000) and females (7.5 per 100,000) in the White/non-Hispanic group,” according to the NIMH.

With suicide numbers steadily increasing, it is becoming a growing concern.

How to stop it from occurring is an uphill battle.

It takes more than just one person getting involved.

We all have to be a part of the solution in trying to see the signs and be our brother’s or sister’s keeper.

I ask my readers to send in their stories of survival or if they know someone that a survivor to inspire others to overcome suicide.

Contact these outlets if you are at risk and not comfortable with resources on campus.

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