Twitter vs. ISIS

By Crystal Norman | Staff Writer |

Twitter has shut down more than 125,000 profiles linked to ISIS content since mid year of 2015, according to ITPRO, a business insight network.

 
Many of the profiles that were shut down included video updates and images of ISIS’s advances to expose their military strength and create fear amongst the public, according to bbc.com.

 
“At first, my initial thought was to say that it was right for Twitter to delete these accounts because no one wants to see that. Then again, if people don’t cover stuff like that, then the public will forget about all the terror ISIS is causing, and people need to be aware,” said student Lukas Montes.

 
Social sites all together have become more aware of terrorist linked profiles since the beheading of journalist James Foley that spread across the World Wide Web in 2014, according to CBS News.

 
Student Miranda Trebino doesn’t have a Twitter account and she heard about Foley’s beheading and is aware of ISIS posting content on Twitter.

 
“Social Media is so big and if one person sees it and they re-tweet, then someone else will re-tweet and on and on. It goes so fast and before you know it millions of people have viewed this content,” said Trebino.

 
Not only did Twitter aggressively try to get rid of these videos and links, sites like Facebook and YouTube have tried to do the same, according to CBS News.

 
The problem lies in the “global nature of social media” where people can create a new account if their other account gets deleted, according to wired.com.

 
“The history of Twitter is that they wanted the ‘Twittersphere,’ their own world with free speech for all regardless of country or origin. Unfortunately, it reflects the real world, where criminal elements can exploit it,” said CSUSB Director of The Cyber Security Center, Tony Coulson in an interview with The Press Enterprise.

 
ISIS is looking to other social media sites to post information now that Twitter is monitoring terrorist-related activity, according to ryot.org.

 
Diaspora is a non-profit organization and is a community-run, distributed social network that ISIS is now posting content on since twitter has locked them out, according to bbc.com.

 
Since Diaspora consists of private individual pods or networks, it’s more difficult for the Diaspora team to monitor and terminate content posted, according to ryot.org.

 
“We are not offering a service, we just create the software driving the network…It’s very unfortunate to see violent groups using our software and as you already know we are working on getting them out of the network,” said Diaspora’s spokesperson, Dennis Schubert in an interview with Buzzfeed.

 
Social media sites are working hard to take down terrorist related content on their websites, ISIS continues to spread their terror, and if Twitter relaxes their policies then ISIS will try again, according to ryot.org.

 
“Although it makes the public more aware, I feel like it might promote violence for younger people too, so the whole issue is controversial,” said Montes.

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