Traveling through time and space

Project Almanac (audreymagazine.com)

By Nadia Ahmad |Staff Writer|

Project Almanac  (audreymagazine.com)

Project Almanac

“Project Almanac”, Michael Bay’s new sci-fi flick, has potential but won’t quite leave an impact.
The film is shot from the point of view of high school senior David Raskin, his sister, his friends, and the most popular girl in school.

They discover pieces of what looks like a time machine in their basement and decide to change the world.
The high school students soon realize that the world around them is in danger due to the ripples they cause every time they travel back in time.

“Some parts of the movie are really cool. I like how when they went back in time, everything was shot in slow motion. I just thought that they used the machine for really petty things,” said CSUSB student Chloe Tokar.

“Like, we get you’ve been bullied throughout high school and you want to be popular and liked, but millions of people are being affected by your decision so maybe not worry about your popularity,” continued Tokar.

Johnny Weston and Sofia Black D'Elia star in Project Almanac. (image by filmgamesetc.com)

Johnny Weston and Sofia Black D’Elia star in Project Almanac.

I agree that some of the decisions seemed a bit immature, but I’m not sure what one would expect from a group of five high school teens.

If you were a 17-year-old boy, what would you want to change? You would most likely want to get the girl, win lots of money, and go to cool music festivals you missed out on.

The movie was fun, but since each of the characters held the camera at different points in the film, the rocky camera footage is distracting, and likely to give you a headache.

“The handheld camera work seems overdone at this point, and so does the idea of time travel. I feel like they were trying to combine ‘Project X’ and ‘Back To The Future’ but it didn’t go so well,” said CSUSB student Travis Bartnett.

It was an interesting directorial decision, but somewhat of a failure for director Dean Isrealite, since most of the students I talked to said they would enjoy the film much more if it weren’t for the chosen cinematography.

I’m sure director Isrealite was shooting for a natural look to the film, but it only made it seem less realistic.

Another component of the film that seemed unrealistic was the acting. The acting seemed very childish and lazy. In my opinion, I felt like the actors knew they were in a low-budget film and refused to give it their all.

For instance, when the group members would get into arguments, one of them would say “You know, you don’t have to film everything.”

However, the character would continue to film everything. My biggest complaints about the film are that it didn’t seem real and that it seemed predictable.

The film might have been appealing if instead of focusing on a high schoolers it focused on college students.
The film wasn’t terrible, but if “redbox” was a genre, the movie would fall under it.

 

 

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