Girls need education and innovative women need support

Courtesy of: https://letgirlslearn.gov

Courtesy of: https://letgirlslearn.gov

By Alana Roche’ |Staff Writer|

More females should be granted an opportunity to receive an education.

We should also support women-oriented entrepreneurship in order to ensure better livelihoods.

“Right now, 62 million girls worldwide are not in school,” according to The Atlantic.

Young girls are being deprived of learning basic skills, such as math, reading and writing, and science.

It is unbelievable to me that there are 62 million girls that are deprived from receiving an education in the year 2015.

I believe that we should join young girls and women in fighting to help them receive proper education and entrepreneurial support.

“[That’s why] last spring, the president and I (Michelle Obama) launched Let Girls Learn, a new initiative to fund community girls’ education projects like girls’ leadership camps and school bathrooms; educate girls in conflict zones; and address poverty, HIV, and other issues that keep girls out of school,” stated FLOTUS Michelle Obama for The Atlantic.

“In other words, we cannot address our girls’ education crisis until we address the broader cultural beliefs and practices that can help cause and perpetuate this crisis,” said Obama.

I agree with Obama that girls who are not allowed an opportunity to educate themselves is more of a cultural issue than a political one.

We should also empower women entrepreneurs so we can continue to succeed.

Silicon Valley has had a lack of female entrepreneurs, according to The New York Times.

Although “women own 40 percent of the private businesses in the United States, according to the Center for Women’s Business Research. But they create only 8 percent of the venture-backed tech start-ups, according to Astia, a nonprofit group that advises female entrepreneurs,” according to The New York Times.

This becomes a problem because of a woman’s lack of willingness to begin a business.

Cyan Banister is a 4-year investor in the Valley and said that “so few female entrepreneurs have approached her that she can count all of them on one hand.”

“While men are hard-wired to be much more open to risk, it’s just not built into us,” added Banister.

I believe that women don’t picture themselves in the tech industry because when one pictures someone who is tech savvy, they immediately imagine a geeky man.

Young girls should not be limited in their aspirations. They should aspire to be a dancer, singer, or start their own company and admire professional women who are excellent examples of pursuing their aspirations for success.

Sites like Kiva or Root Capital invest in small, low-income businesses in poor parts of Africa and Latin America.

“We are a non-profit organization with a mission to connect people through lending to alleviate poverty,” Kiva stated on their website.

I actively use Kiva. Kiva allows users to lend money to entrepreneurs across the globe.

I know that this is not a huge contribution, but I believe that I’m helping a small portion to benefit the bigger picture.

I read the profiles of the people I want to help, tending more towards women who are attempting to start small businesses in rural areas.

“They say it takes a village to raise a child, but with the right education, a child can also raise her whole village,” stated Benjamin Jackson, Managing Editor of The Window.

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